This presentation aims to identify salient perspectives of culture and the importance in relation to end-of-life decision making and care; how to construct a plan for end-of-life care that identifies and accommodates culture as well as identifying ones own cultural perspectives in end-of-life care.

This paper describes a communication workshop intended to introduce physicians how to introduce culturally responsive care into their practice in palliative and end-of-life care.

This publication reviews findings and recommendations particular to the context of California.  Barriers and lessons learned may provide guidance for end-of-life care for immigrant populations in other geographies.

This literature review and current state assessment provides an annotated bibliography and was a part of a knowledge translation tools project.

This presentation aims to raise awareness of and enhance the care for people at end of life including how to understand how cultural factors influence end of life decision making.  

Research has identified three basic dimensions in end-of-life treatment that vary culturally: communication of “bad news”; locus of decision making; and attitudes toward advance directives and end-of-life care. In contrast to the emphasis on “truth telling” in the United States, it is not uncommon for health care professionals outside the United States to conceal serious diagnoses from patients, because disclosure of serious illness may be viewed as disrespectful, impolite, or even harmful to the patient.

Quality palliative care helps you honour your culture, spirituality and traditions. At LivingMyCulture.ca, people from various cultures share their stories and wisdom about living with serious illness, end of life and grief to support others.

This review highlights that most research has focused on decision-making. There were fewer studies exploring different cultural and spiritual experiences at the EoL and interventions to improve EoL care. Interventions evaluated were largely educational in nature rather than service oriented.

Within the process of providing end-of-life care, cultural factors can significantly influence patients’ reactions to their illnesses and the decisions they make. As a patient and his or her family transitions from point to point in the process of coping with the serious illness, culture may impact key aspects.

The focus of this article will be on cross-cultural issues at the end of life for ethnically and culturally diverse groups in the United States. The health care provider must have a clear understanding and recognition of the unique and specific influences culture has on a patient’s behavior, attitudes, preferences, and decisions around end-of-life care. 

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