This is an executive summary that  focuses on the interrelationship between health care consent and advance care planning under Ontario law, and on related misconceptions of health practitioners and health care organizations.  At common law and under Ontario legislation, informed consent is required before a health practitioner can provide treatment to a patient. Importantly, where a patient is found incapable, the requirement to obtain informed consent is not abrogated, but instead the informed consent is obtained from communications with substitute decision makers (SDMs).

This template is developed for institutions to assist in creating or updating their Health Care Consent (HCC) and Advance Care Planning  (ACP) Policy. It provides important information to consider.

This tip sheet reviews the requirements for informed consent and the hierachy of Substitute Decision Makers (SDM) listed in the Health Care Consent Act (Ontario).  Requirements of SDM as per the HCCA s.20 are outlined.

This tip sheet provides details about the Health Care Consent Act (HCCA) and Advance Care Planning in Ontario.  The roles of the health care practitioner, substitute decision maker and patient are outlined. "Best interests" are defined as set out by the HCCA.

This presentation by Judith Wahl gives an overview of key points about Advance Care Planning and Health Care Consent in an Ontario community care setting.

This presentation is about the ABC's of Health Care Consent and Advance Care Planning (ACP) and what Lawyers and Investment Advisors should know for the work they do for clients as well as professionalism issues related to advising clients about Health Care Consent and Advance Care Planning.

This presentation given by Judith Wahl is intended to provide an overview of the key facts related to Health Care Consent and Advance Care Planning in the Ontario context of acute and primary care settings.

This presentation by Judith Wahl is about Advance Care Planning in Ontario.  She talks about identifying your substitite decision maker and how to have a conversation about what is important to you.

This presentation is about the basics about Health Care Consent and Advance Care Planning and who is the decision maker for health care; the resident or the residents' Substitute Decision Maker and why. As well you will discover what Capacity to make a treatment decision means and who determines if a resident is mentally capable.

This toolkit was produced for use of the Ontario Hospital Association and is intended to provide health care professionals with a general understanding of mental health law issues with an overview of the legislation that governs the provision of mental health in Ontario. It should not be used in place of legal advice.  It does describe key legislation such as the Mental Health Act, Health Care Consent Act, Substitute Decisions Act and the Personal Health Information Protection Act.  It reviews the issues of consent to treat and determining capacity to consent and the role of Substitute Decision Makers.

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